продукт элитарного взращивания

[info]aptsvet:
Любой реальный язык есть продукт “порчи”, а не элитарного взращивания.

[info]larvatus:
Французский язык является продуктом элитарного взращивания со времён кардинала Ришелье. И если можно поиздеваться над тщетными потугами вытеснения англицизмов типа email и software туземными новообразованиями типа courriel и logiciel, несомненно, что литературный модернизм от Бодлера до Бекетта обязан своим существованием именно этому академическому аскетизму.

[info]aptsvet:
В каком-то смысле верно и заслуживает особого внимания. Тем не менее, не мне одному кажется, что французская модель надзора за языком не идеальна. Русская, кстати, с нее во многом скопирована.

[info]larvatus:
Ежели верно и заслуживает внимания, зачем тогда стулья ломать?

[info]aptsvet:
Во-первых, в силу иных убеждений. Во-вторых, там тоже не так просто, многие нынешние авторы прилагают все усилия, чтобы не скатиться в язык Расина.

[info]larvatus:
И первое и второе понятно и оправдано. Но всё же, Ваше заявление, что любой реальный язык есть продукт “порчи”, а не элитарного взращивания, полностью опровергается вышеуказанным исключением.

[info]aptsvet:
О, я могу привести контрпримеры еще лучше—эсперанто, например, не говоря уже о строго формализованных языках программирования. Литературному французскому до этих эталонов далеко. Но я все же берусь предсказать, что узус победит норму и во французском, а польза его контролируемой эволюции для меня неочевидна.

[info]larvatus:
Контрпример эсперанто, не говоря уже о строго формализованных языках программирования, в контексте разговора о реальных языках проходит под рубрикой лёгкого издевательства, если не злостной софистики. Я не спорю с Вашими предсказаниями победы лингвистического народничества и восприятиями неочевидности пользы контролируемой эволюции. Меня удивляет лишь кульминация Вашей полемики заведомо ложным утверждением.

[info]aptsvet:
Лучше все же взглянуть в начало, в исходный пост. Ситуация в эпоху классической латыни, особенно серебряной, была во многом сходна с нынешней французской. Индукция имеет свои минусы, но лучше инструмента у нас нет.

[info]larvatus:
Самый лучший инструмент—это правда. Индукции здесь не стояло. В противном случае, мы бы всё ещё существовали в пещерах.

[info]aptsvet:
Пещеры тут ни при чем. Мне кажется, вы путаете мою неприязнь к лексической регламентации с отрицанием речевого этикета, на который я ни в коем случае не посягаю—наоборот, постоянно сетую на его кризис в сегодняшнем русском языке. Тем не менее, к грамматическому роду кофе он никакого отношения не имеет.

[info]larvatus:
Я пишу не про отрицание речевого этикета, и тем более не про грамматический род слова кофе, а про вполне реальный язык, являющийся продуктом “элитарного взращивания”.

no ptyx

― for Eric Gans

    In 1887, Stéphane Mallarmé published a sonnet composed in the form of an allegory of itself. Its outer parts, the first quatrain and the second tercet, comprised a frame that contained the inner parts, the second quatrain and the first tercet. Their relation represented the way whereby the literal subject matter of the poem, a window reflected in the mirror in a darkened room, contained the nighttime sky. To complicate his task further, the poet chose to alternate in the quatrains the masculine rhymes in ‘ix’ and ‘yx’ that ended with a consonant, with feminine rhymes in ‘ore’ that ended in a silent e, inverting their genders to feminine ‘ixe’ and ‘yxe’ alternated with masculine ‘or’ in the tercets. The French vocabulary is ill suited to supplying rhymes in ‘ix/yx’. In response to this deficiency, Mallarmé invested the word ptyx with a novel meaning. His usage seemed at first a hapax legomenon within French literature, a term thitherto unexpressed in its language. But in ancient and modern Greek, πτύξ stood for a layer, a plate, a fold, or a writing tablet. In particular, it designated a special kind of a fold, such as may be found in a seashell. In fact, Victor Hugo already had drawn his inspiration from this term to employ Ptyx as a proper name in La Légende des siècles. Mallarmé had something very different in mind. His ptyx was not any given being, place, or thing, but a special kind of object. Its very nature inhered in its absence:

Ses purs ongles très haut dédiant leur onyx,
LAngoisse, ce minuit, soutient, lampadophore,
Maint rêve vespéral brûlé par le Phénix
Que ne recueille pas de cinéraire amphore
Her pure nails sprung up exalting their onyx,
Anxiety, this midnight, bearing light, sustains,
In twilight many dreams burnt up by the Phoenix
Whose smoky ashes no sepulchral urn contains
Sur les crédences, au salon vide : nul ptyx
Aboli bibelot dinanité sonore,
(Car le Maître est allé puiser des pleurs au Styx
Avec ce seul objet dont le Néant shonore.)
Atop the sideboards, in the empty room: no ptyx,
That voided toy of vibrant nonsense, left inside,
(Because the Master’s gone to draw the tears from Styx
With that exclusive object wherein Naught takes pride.)
Mais proche la croisée au nord vacante, un or
Agonise selon peut-être le décor
Des licornes ruant du feu contre une nixe,
In vacant north seen through the casement frames, a gold
May agonize at times, within the setting, to behold
Fire-breathing unicorns arrayed against a nix,
Elle, défunte nue en le miroir, encor
Que, dans loubli fermé par le cadre, se fixe
De scintillations sitôt le septuor.
She, lifeless naked mirror image, repetition
Whom in the twinkling framed forgetting, is to fix
Through sparkling timed in septet, composition.
― Stéphane Mallarmé, Œuvres complètes, édition présentée, établie et annotée par Bertrand Marchal, tome I, Gallimard: Bibliothéque de la Pléiade, 1998 (MOC I), pp. 37-38, cf. p. 98 ― translated by MZ

Continue reading no ptyx

concerning the lives of stéphane mallarmé on and off the isle of ptyx

― in living memory of my father    

    Il n’existe que trois êtres respectables :
    Le prêtre, le guerrier, le poète. Savoir, tuer et créer.
    Les autres hommes sont taillables et corvéables, faits pour l’écurie, c’est-à-dire pour exercer ce qu’on appelle des professions.
    — Charles Baudelaire, Mon cœur mis à nu
    There exist but three respectable beings:
    The priest, the warrior, the poet. To know, to kill, to create.
    The rest of men belong to the fatigue party, made for the stables, in other words for the practice of that, which is called professions.
    — Charles Baudelaire, My heart laid bare[0]

Stéphane Mallarmé began his career in nearly devotional emulation of the ill-fated cultivator of les fleurs du mal. Notwithstanding the affinities of his ethos, his destiny was to differ in one significant regard. Or so he insisted in a letter to his friend Henri Cazalis, written in October of 1862:[1] Continue reading concerning the lives of stéphane mallarmé on and off the isle of ptyx

the ethos of translation I

The Raven, by Edgar Allan Poe Le Corbeau traduit par Charles Baudelaire Le Corbeau traduit par Stéphane Mallarmé

1 Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore —
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
“’Tis some visiter,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door —
    Only this, and nothing more.”
    Une fois, sur le minuit lugubre, pendant que je méditais, faible et fatigué, sur maint précieux et curieux volume d’une doctrine oubliée, pendant que je donnais de la tête, presque assoupi, soudain il se fit un tapotement, comme de quelqu’un frappant doucement, frappant à la porte de ma chambre. « C’est quelque visiteur, — murmurai-je, — qui frappe à la porte de ma chambre ; ce n’est que cela et rien de plus. »     Une fois, par un minuit lugubre, tandis que je m’appesantissais, faible et fatigué, sur maint curieux et bizarre volume de savoir oublié, — tandis que je dodelinais la tête, somnolant presque, soudain se fit un heurt, comme de quelqu’un frappant doucement, frappant à la porte de ma chambre, — cela seul et rien de plus.

Continue reading the ethos of translation I

0. rien de louche

    Il n’existe que trois êtres respectables :
    Le prêtre, le guerrier, le poète. Savoir, tuer et créer.
    Les autres hommes sont taillables et corvéables, faits pour l’écurie, c’est-à-dire pour exercer ce qu’on appelle des professions.
    — Charles Baudelaire, Mon cœur mis à nu
    There exist but three respectable beings:
    The priest, the warrior, the poet. To know, to kill, to create.
    The rest of men belong to the fatigue party, made for the stables, in other words for the practice of that, which is called professions.
    — Charles Baudelaire, My heart laid bare, translated by MZ


Charles Baudelaire in 1855, photograph taken by Nadar


Je suis fier d’une chose, et très fier. C’est que mes enfants, si Dieu m’en donne, n’auront pas du sang de marchand dans les veines. Leur grand-père n’aura pas mis le matin un pain à cacheter sous la balance pour qu’elle pèse un centigramme de plus et qu’elle livre un centigramme de mélasse de moins; lequel centigramme répété vingt fois dans la journée fait un cinquième de gramme, et au bout de cinq jours un gramme, de sorte qu’après avoir pendant un mois mérité six cents fois d’aller en prison, on gagne un sou — six grammes de mélasse valant un sou. Voilà le commerce.
    Avant d’épouser une femme riche tout honnête homme doit dire : Cet argent a-t-il été gagné en faisant des livres, en enseignant, en travailllant avec une plume à la main ? Au grand soleil ? Point de pièces qui aient sonné dans un comptoir !
    Sentir dans mes cheveux une main qui a roulé des cornets ! Boire l’infini dans un œil qui pendant dix ans ait épié l’instant où l’acheteur se retournait pour enlever une pincée de sucre an poudre ! Pouah !… Si ce n’est elle qui l’eût fait, c’eût été son père. Si ce n’est son père, son grand-père, si ce n’est son grand-père, son bisaïeul.
    J’ai pour devise : Rien de louche — et tout commerce est louche. Je méprise autant la veuve Clicquot que la mère Grégoire. On vole en grand, voilà tout. Ils sont nécessaires ces gens-là? oui, comme les lacquais. Je donnerai mes bottes à mon lacquais, mas pas la main de ma fille.
    — Stéphane Mallarmé à Henri Cazalis, octobre 1862
There is one thing I am proud of, and I am very proud of it. It’s that my children, if God gives me any, will not have the blood of merchants in their veins. Their grandfather will not have placed one morning a piece of sealing-wax under his scales, so that they weigh a hundredth of a gram more and deliver a hundredth of a gram of molasses less, which hundredth of a gram repeated twenty times a day makes a fifth of a gram, and after five days a whole gram, so that after having deserved imprisonment six hundred times in a month, you make one sou’s profit — six grams of molasses being worth one sou. That’s business for you.
    Before getting married to a rich woman, every honest man should ask — was that money earned by producing books, by teaching people, by living by the pen? Out in the open air? No coins that have rang on the counters!
    To feel running through my hair a hand that has rolled pastry! Drink the infinite in the eyes that for ten years watched for the moment when a customer’s back was turned to remove a pinch of powdered sugar! Phew! Even if she had not done it herself, her father would have. And if not her father, her grandfather; if not her grandfather, her great-grandfather.
    I have for a motto: Nothing suspect, and all business is suspect. I despise the Veuve Clicquot as much as Mother Grégoire [a saloon-keeper in an operetta by Scribe and Boisseaux]. It’s stealing big, that’s all. Is this kind of people necessary? Yes, just like servants. I will hand over my boots to my servant, but not my daughter’s hand in marriage.
    — Stéphane Mallarmé to Henri Cazalis, October 1862, translated by MZ


Édouard Manet, Stéphane Mallarmé, 1876, oil on canvas 27x36cm, Musée d’Orsay